Ghibli II winter works

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
Me neither...

Based on some very conservative measurements there should be plenty of space to drill. Bolt is 5mm shorter than existing threads (current hole ~21mm), adding 7mm more would get to an estimated 12mm minimum thread engagement (~15mm is the stock).

72724
 

azapa

Member
Messages
1,107
I'm really guessing here, and you are far more advanced than I am, but I'd do a couple of things before your next torque session: oil threads (unless of course thread-lock is called for) and check your torque wrench or gauge with another one.

I have had an old torque wrench go WAY out of spec and cause some problems before.

Good luck and keep up the good attitude!
 

TimR

Member
Messages
1,707
Uneviable task. Can you construct a jig to hold your hand tools. using whatever fixing points you can secure ? This would enable you to manage depth of your drill too; you'll need good swarf management as well..
Even the simple task of tapping a a thread can go t1t s up without precautions....! :oops:
 

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
I'm really guessing here, and you are far more advanced than I am, but I'd do a couple of things before your next torque session: oil threads (unless of course thread-lock is called for) and check your torque wrench or gauge with another one.

I have had an old torque wrench go WAY out of spec and cause some problems before.
Thread were lubricated, also cross checked my torque wrenches (fairly new) last time when I was verifying the tightness of head bolts. The threads were possibly damaged, and the repeated camshaft installations did no good to it. Felt it by hand, should have paid more attention.

D A M N ..... you really don't have a streak of luck...... :worried1:
That's for sure

Uneviable
task. Can you construct a jig to hold your hand tools. using whatever fixing points you can secure ? This would enable you to manage depth of your drill too; you'll need good swarf management as well..
Even the simple task of tapping a a thread can go t1t s up without precautions....! :oops:
I feel the same, probability of success is low. Will try on the old head first. I've ordered a combined drill and tap, hoping that the remainders of the threads will center the tool at the tapping section. Also will keep the cap installed (bolted on one side only) to keep things even more square.

What a cocker. What torque did you use? I can’t imagine it’s more than 10 ftlbs.
A bit more, manual calls for 20Nm which is around 15 ftlbs.
 

fphil

Junior Member
Messages
79
May be on first hand on a bench you can drill a screw along its axial center to serve as a guide?
 

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
That was also my idea, asked some machinists but there would be nothing left from the bolt after drilling to core drill size.

Bought some aluminium stock, will practice first with the combi drill after replicating the situation.
 

Oneball

Member
Messages
5,511
Go and hire a magnetic stand drill, then bolt a piece of 1/2” steel to the head and attached the drill stand to that.
 

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
Go and hire a magnetic stand drill, then bolt a piece of 1/2” steel to the head and attached the drill stand to that.
Unfortunately couldn't find any available nearby.

Fortunately problem solved meanwhile. It was much more simple than expected after practicing on stock and on the old head. The cap is a pretty good guide, also put some masking tape on the drill for a tighter fit. Drilled an additional 10mm with 6.8, tapped and installed M8x45 instead of the stock M8x35. Torqued, all good now.

72995

Started setting up the timing. I didn't remember it was such a fiddly job. Properly setting up the dial gauges to minimize cosine error took quite some time, there is only a tiny spot available on the tappets. Right hand side is done, will continue later with left hand side.
 

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
Some minor updates I've missed last time.

Exhaust manifolds had minor wrappage what I only noticed at assembly. They are now flat again

73653

Replaced all the joints in the gear shifting linkage for a more precise shifting, but missed the foam in the joint on the gearbox. It's replaced now, which eliminated the remaining play.

73654

The biggest update is about the clutch lever. It has been replaced to the late Ghibli / QP4 and 3200GT spec which utilizes cam follower bearings to mitigate the heavy clutch feeling.

73655

73656

73657

Finally the engine is now properly timed, took some effort to get into factory specs, but all good now. Went back with a lot less fight than last time after dropping the subframe too (had to do it as I was without assistance). Everything is connected now and ready for a start.

73658

I planned to do it today, but last time while searching for the noise I wasn't paying proper attention, it was running only on idle for max 10 minutes. This time I want to pay more attention because of the new rings. Any suggestions for mineral engine oil to be used for the first few hundred kms?
 

Oishi

Member
Messages
485
I feel like a noob offering advice to someone of your talents, but I have used Shell Rotella T as a mineral break in oil.
Awesome write up BTW, thanks.
 
Last edited:

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
Ok, so my plan is (possible oil debate!)
  • Cheap mineral for the first 20 minutes in the garage, Mobil Super 1000 X1 15W40
  • Break-on oil for the first few hundred kms, Millers CRO 10W40
  • Then switch to fully synthetic, planning to use Millers CFS 10W60; used Selenia Racing so far but earlier oil analysis didn't reveal too good numbers
I know it might be an overkill given pistons and cylinder walls are not new, weren't honed (as Nigusil shouldn't be honed like Nikasil) but at this point I rather overdo than cut corners. I'm a bit worried about new rings not seating on old walls, but will monitor progress with leak down testing. Initial cold numbers are around 5-10% loss.
 

Oneball

Member
Messages
5,511
I think Mobile Super 1000 is a synthetic, I would use a mineral but other than that, that’s how I usually run stuff in but mine are usually pushrod motors.

Vary the revs (no motorways) and don’t lug the engine.
 

spacecadet

Member
Messages
365
I think Mobile Super 1000 is a synthetic, I would use a mineral but other than that, that’s how I usually run stuff in but mine are usually pushrod motors.
It's conventional / mineral oil
https://www.mobil.com/en-fr/passenger-vehicle-lube/pds/eu-xx-mobil-super-1000-x1-15w40

Vary the revs (no motorways) and don’t lug the engine.
Right, shouldn't lug it anyhow :)

This was my original choice too, but then decided on Millers CRO as it's specifically a break-in oil. But found a lot of posts about people using VR1 because of the high zinc content. Which as I understand is more important for cam break-in.
 

Oishi

Member
Messages
485
The reason for the Rotella recommendation is the zinc content is higher for better lube during break in, I don't know if you can get it over there.
 

Oneball

Member
Messages
5,511
Zinc protects against high impact forces as on cam lobes.

A break in oil is designed to burn in the cylinders so it provides less protect to the bores and encourages seating