Pic of the day

alfatwo

Member
Messages
5,322
Surprised that some looney has not parked inches away from it... always happens to me at Tesco!
Yea I get that all the time in Sainsburys ...you park miles away from the entrance then you get some **** park 12inches away from your door!

Dave
 

Vampyrebat

Member
Messages
2,610
Yea I get that all the time in Sainsburys ...you park miles away from the entrance then you get some **** park 12inches away from your door!

Dave
Where ever possible I try to find a parallel parking spot on the end as I feel safer in these.
You can't tell in the photo as we are too far away but we are parked in a spot where the angle of car parking spaces changes this causing a triangular 'dead spot'. I take advantage of this and park the car partly within this area ........Pretty safe......But you never know!!
 

P5Nij

Member
Messages
976
I think it's a Tipo 63.... ;)

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I'm trying to make my Biturbo 430 sound more exotic by referring to it as 'the Tipo AM332' but her indoors is having none of it, to her it's still 'the boxey Mazda'!
 

Andyk

Member
Messages
56,353
Just looking through some old pictures and came over nostalgic ……Brunty On Your Marks was such a great event and we raised a chunk of money for charity. I think we did 3 in total…Or maybe 4 and I know everyone had so much fun especially taking around the children. Just a shame Asda stopped it but with all the red tape we couldn’t justify any claims etc…..Great days though….So some of you will pick out cars you had that have come and gone. 88343883448834588346883478834888349883508835188352
 
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philw696

Moderator
Staff member
Messages
16,943
An interesting read.
There’s bending the rules—and there’s breaking the rules.
In the early days of competition, there was a fair amount of grey in the rules and the way cars were constructed. In a race weekend, for even the most ardent officials, there’s simply not enough time to have every machine be torn down and checked against the rulebook. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans, for instance, the three phases of checks takes the better part of two entire working days.
You can check things before or after, but what about during the race? Moreover, if you were running second place before a service area and a mechanic replaces your fire extinguisher with one filled to the brim with power-boosting NOS, would you be able to leave the trigger alone?
Don’t laugh: stranger things have happened. Talking about cheating may be down to your interpretation of the rules and events that followed, but in rally there have been a few ingenious “solutions” for getting to the finish faster than competitors.
|
1985 Rallye Cote d’Ivoire
Michele Mouton was a force to be reckoned with in her Audi Sport Quattro, though during this race, early engine troubles sidelined her #2 car. After finishing a stage with a particularly grim-sounding engine that was belching ominous white smoke, the other team bosses were expecting a retirement and so were surprised to find Mouton leaving service—with the #11 car of Braun Franz and Arewd Fischer following closely behind.
The #2 left the rally route, took nearly an hour and a half of time penalties, and rejoined, without engine trouble. Audi’s official explanation was that the #11 car gave its oil pump to put Mouton back in the race, but multiple accounts charge the team with switching every body panel from the sick car to the healthy one—something the scrutineers said couldn’t be done, and the allegations were unproven. When someone noticed that the car’s windshields had apparently been swapped, team boss Roland Gumpert said Mouton’s “anti-fog” system had failed.
If you start getting all Zapruder on things, you’ll notice some odd details, including hood-mounted fog lights at the base of the windshield that seem to move between cars.
|
1966 Monte Carlo Rally
In rally, sometimes the rules can be bent the other way, such that in 1966, ten cars were disqualified from this event for having headlight bulbs that didn’t match items fitted as standard to the production version. That year, the fastest Mini Coopers would have finished 1, 2, 3 with Timo Mäkinen, Rauno Aaltonen, and Paddy Hopkirk; instead, victory went to a most normal Citroën ID19 (but you can call it the DS).

| Any time there’s snow
Though far more difficult to do these days, in the early days of rallying, some better-funded teams would shovel the course in advance of its cars—it’s most effective if your closest competitors were starting ahead of you. Spectators have been known to be arrested and charged for (stupidly) shoveling snow onto the course, too, for the opposite effect.

| 1991 Lancia Delta Integrale
With huge budgets at its disposal, the Lancia Rally Team did like everyone else did and innovated in areas where the rules were yet to follow. That year, Deltas were entered—depending on the event—with water-cooled brakes and suspension, electronic centre differentials, movable radiator cooling openings…
In Lancia Delta 4×4 / Integrale, author Graham Robson mentions an Autosport report from the Corsica round, where reporter Keith Oswin notes fire extinguishers in the leading cars were changed regularly. That was odd, since they were supposed to be plumbed-in, never used, and part of a fire suppression system. Rival teams rumored that more potent fuel was being used, but nothing was proven.

| Toyota’s 1995 World Rally Championship
This story would be nothing without Toyota’s exclusion from the 1995 World Rally Championship, when after a lot of careful investigation—involving microscopes and leak tests—FIA scrutineers were able to detect a solution that must have cost Toyota a pretty penny to develop.
An ingenious, fully-engineered, and nearly undetectable mechanism moved the car’s mandated restrictor plates, offering not only 25 per cent airflow but as much as 50 extra horsepower. Then-FIA President Max Mosley said:
“Inside, it was beautifully made. The springs inside the hose had been polished and machined so not to impede the air which passed through. To force the springs open without the special tool would require substantial force. It is the most sophisticated and ingenious device either I or the FIA’s technical experts have seen for a long-time. It was so well made that there was no gap apparent to suggest there was any means of opening it.”
 

Zep

Moderator
Messages
6,450
Just looking through some old pictures and came over nostalgic ……Brunty On Your Marks was such a great event and we raised a chunk of money for charity. I think we did 3 in total…Or maybe 4 and I know everyone had so much fun especially taking around the children. Just a shame Asda stopped it but with all the red tape we couldn’t justify any claims etc…..Great days though….So some of you will pick out cars you had that have come and gone. View attachment 88343View attachment 88344View attachment 88345View attachment 88346View attachment 88347View attachment 88348View attachment 88349View attachment 88350View attachment 88351View attachment 88352
it is a big shame that they stopped, really enjoyed those days. The grinning passenger in my Black GS seemed to like it too :D
 

P5Nij

Member
Messages
976
An interesting read.
There’s bending the rules—and there’s breaking the rules.
In the early days of competition, there was a fair amount of grey in the rules and the way cars were constructed. In a race weekend, for even the most ardent officials, there’s simply not enough time to have every machine be torn down and checked against the rulebook. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans, for instance, the three phases of checks takes the better part of two entire working days.
You can check things before or after, but what about during the race? Moreover, if you were running second place before a service area and a mechanic replaces your fire extinguisher with one filled to the brim with power-boosting NOS, would you be able to leave the trigger alone?
Don’t laugh: stranger things have happened. Talking about cheating may be down to your interpretation of the rules and events that followed, but in rally there have been a few ingenious “solutions” for getting to the finish faster than competitors.
|
1985 Rallye Cote d’Ivoire
Michele Mouton was a force to be reckoned with in her Audi Sport Quattro, though during this race, early engine troubles sidelined her #2 car. After finishing a stage with a particularly grim-sounding engine that was belching ominous white smoke, the other team bosses were expecting a retirement and so were surprised to find Mouton leaving service—with the #11 car of Braun Franz and Arewd Fischer following closely behind.
The #2 left the rally route, took nearly an hour and a half of time penalties, and rejoined, without engine trouble. Audi’s official explanation was that the #11 car gave its oil pump to put Mouton back in the race, but multiple accounts charge the team with switching every body panel from the sick car to the healthy one—something the scrutineers said couldn’t be done, and the allegations were unproven. When someone noticed that the car’s windshields had apparently been swapped, team boss Roland Gumpert said Mouton’s “anti-fog” system had failed.
If you start getting all Zapruder on things, you’ll notice some odd details, including hood-mounted fog lights at the base of the windshield that seem to move between cars.
|
1966 Monte Carlo Rally
In rally, sometimes the rules can be bent the other way, such that in 1966, ten cars were disqualified from this event for having headlight bulbs that didn’t match items fitted as standard to the production version. That year, the fastest Mini Coopers would have finished 1, 2, 3 with Timo Mäkinen, Rauno Aaltonen, and Paddy Hopkirk; instead, victory went to a most normal Citroën ID19 (but you can call it the DS).

| Any time there’s snow
Though far more difficult to do these days, in the early days of rallying, some better-funded teams would shovel the course in advance of its cars—it’s most effective if your closest competitors were starting ahead of you. Spectators have been known to be arrested and charged for (stupidly) shoveling snow onto the course, too, for the opposite effect.

| 1991 Lancia Delta Integrale
With huge budgets at its disposal, the Lancia Rally Team did like everyone else did and innovated in areas where the rules were yet to follow. That year, Deltas were entered—depending on the event—with water-cooled brakes and suspension, electronic centre differentials, movable radiator cooling openings…
In Lancia Delta 4×4 / Integrale, author Graham Robson mentions an Autosport report from the Corsica round, where reporter Keith Oswin notes fire extinguishers in the leading cars were changed regularly. That was odd, since they were supposed to be plumbed-in, never used, and part of a fire suppression system. Rival teams rumored that more potent fuel was being used, but nothing was proven.

| Toyota’s 1995 World Rally Championship
This story would be nothing without Toyota’s exclusion from the 1995 World Rally Championship, when after a lot of careful investigation—involving microscopes and leak tests—FIA scrutineers were able to detect a solution that must have cost Toyota a pretty penny to develop.
An ingenious, fully-engineered, and nearly undetectable mechanism moved the car’s mandated restrictor plates, offering not only 25 per cent airflow but as much as 50 extra horsepower. Then-FIA President Max Mosley said:
“Inside, it was beautifully made. The springs inside the hose had been polished and machined so not to impede the air which passed through. To force the springs open without the special tool would require substantial force. It is the most sophisticated and ingenious device either I or the FIA’s technical experts have seen for a long-time. It was so well made that there was no gap apparent to suggest there was any means of opening it.”
After the Citroen crew had received their trophies at Monte in '66 they felt as though the Mini Coopers had actually won it fair and square and were quite embarrassed about it all. Even before the rally began, there were rumours circulating about the French being determined to kybosh any genuine win by the BMC team. Still, come '67 the Rally was won by BMC and they felt fully vindicated....

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The winning car 'LBL 6D' lives not far from me at Gaydon, it always raises a smile when I see it there in the museum as I had the Corgi toy of it as a kid....

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