Garage floors - tiles or epoxy?

JonW

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#21
Does anyone have views on whether epoxy is the better long-term solution to the floor tile route?

I've looked at the prices, and both seem fairly equally matched, depending on where about you want to be on the spectrum.

The cheapest place I've found for decent tiles is Screwfix, and it looks like it would cost me roughly £650 for my 42sqm garage. More expensive tiles (Ecotile, Duramat, Trek, etc) means the price would be closer to £1000. Epoxy is slightly cheaper, but given I probably do need a sealer/primer, and possibly 2-3 coats of paint, I think that's going to be between £5-600 for the paint, plus extras for accessories, etc...
 

mjheathcote

Centenary Club
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5,970
#22
For sure, the tile route will last forever.
My ecotile floor tiles are solid PVC.
I have no experience of epoxy, but there is always the possibility of it lifting if not bonded correctly, and chipping/cracking I guess too.
My 30 square meters cost more than a grand though, can't remember now, but I did go for the correct tapered leading edges and also the PVC skirting board to cover the expansion gap around the perimeter.
At the time you could only buy the industrial thickness tiles, but I believe now you can buy slightly thinner, and cheaper, 'domestic' grade tiles.
Tiles also cover up any unevenness/ripples/ridges in the concrete surface, so you have a nice flat surface with tiles.
Also they are insulating, keeping the cold away, so nice to walk on in socks.
You always have the option, should you move house, to take them with you!
 

JonW

Member
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1,222
#23
For sure, the tile route will last forever.
My ecotile floor tiles are solid PVC.
I have no experience of epoxy, but there is always the possibility of it lifting if not bonded correctly, and chipping/cracking I guess too.
My 30 square meters cost more than a grand though, can't remember now, but I did go for the correct tapered leading edges and also the PVC skirting board to cover the expansion gap around the perimeter.
At the time you could only buy the industrial thickness tiles, but I believe now you can buy slightly thinner, and cheaper, 'domestic' grade tiles.
Tiles also cover up any unevenness/ripples/ridges in the concrete surface, so you have a nice flat surface with tiles.
Also they are insulating, keeping the cold away, so nice to walk on in socks.
You always have the option, should you move house, to take them with you!
I've been looking some more, and you're right, some of the higher quality (more expensive) tile brands are coming in at closer to £1600 for the tiles and ramps....
 

Ewan

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2,412
#24
Tiles are longer lasting (if you don't smash any). But they can be more slippy and you may need to re-grout at some stage. And of course, it's far more expensive to lay tiles than roller on some paint. The adhesive and grout alone for tiles can be the same cost as epoxy.

Smart garage showrooms with big profits have tiles. Normal workshops and factories have epoxy. Personally I prefer the seamless look of a liquid epoxy finish, but if you have the money, a tile finish is of course jolly smart (as long as you pay for an excellent fitter).
 

JonW

Member
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1,222
#25
Tiles are longer lasting (if you don't smash any). But they can be more slippy and you may need to re-grout at some stage. And of course, it's far more expensive to lay tiles than roller on some paint. The adhesive and grout alone for tiles can be the same cost as epoxy.

Smart garage showrooms with big profits have tiles. Normal workshops and factories have epoxy. Personally I prefer the seamless look of a liquid epoxy finish, but if you have the money, a tile finish is of course jolly smart (as long as you pay for an excellent fitter).
Thanks Ewan - I don't need my garage to look like a swanky showroom, and have decided to go the epoxy route.

Have been recommended this stuff...

http://www.watco.co.uk/epoxy-matt-coat-epoxy-floor-paint.html
 

mjheathcote

Centenary Club
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5,970
#27
Tiles are longer lasting (if you don't smash any). But they can be more slippy and you may need to re-grout at some stage. And of course, it's far more expensive to lay tiles than roller on some paint. The adhesive and grout alone for tiles can be the same cost as epoxy.

Smart garage showrooms with big profits have tiles. Normal workshops and factories have epoxy. Personally I prefer the seamless look of a liquid epoxy finish, but if you have the money, a tile finish is of course jolly smart (as long as you pay for an excellent fitter).
Not thinking of ceramic tiles here, but the interlocking solid PVC tiles that are impossible to break! Once interlocked they are seamless and also they are not slippy even when wet. Easy to lay yourself, no bonding or glueing, just interlock and wack them together with a rubber mallet.
I agree a professionally laid floated epoxy floor is great, but you aren't going to get that painting it yourself.
 
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1,638
#28
I went with epoxy - would have to be approaching a couple of years now. Still in excellent condition. A breeze to sweep/vac/mop.
 

zagatoes30

Centenary Club
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10,054
#29
Garage revamp is on our to do list, complete rewire, plaster walls and probably tile the floor looking forward to the challenge
 
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#30
Thought I'd provide an update....

Today was step 1 of my garage makeover, which was to clear everything out....

Tomorrow I will be painting the walls, and later in the week I'm having 3 coats of light grey Epoxy Matt Coat applied to the floor (http://www.watco.co.uk/epoxy-matt-coat-epoxy-floor-paint.html)

Here is a couple of before pics...
 

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#32
Whilst we are on the subject of garages - has anyone had electric doors retrofitted. If anyone has, and can give an idea of cost + advice I would appreciate it.
 

mjheathcote

Centenary Club
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5,970
#33
I've changed up and over garage doors to sectional Hormann electric.
Advantage being the sectional cone down vertically allowing parking right up to either side, which gains valuable length.
Also can gain extra width too, as the door goes behind the wall, not between, which gains a couple of inches either side when driving into a garage, a definite bonus if a single width door.
The sectional doors can be insulated, and I can testify in my garage a few years ago plus 8 inside, and minus 20 outside, with the two temperatures measured on either side of the door.
When they are closed, they can't be easily forced open from the outside.
The only negative is the fact they have to be mounted behind the wall, not between, and this can be a problem when retrofitting from a traditional up and over.
I've had three retrofitted over the last 15 years, first thing we have done to a house.
 

redsonnylee

Centenary Club
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1,054
#34
I had my old wooden doors replaced with a Horman electric roller, it was insulated plus two remote controls. This was two years ago cost was £1681.68. If you want some pics let me know and I'll do it tomorrow. There is a manual override in case of no electricity, also I always turn the power off when away. I also fitted a new door to the rear so can enter from the garden.

One error was not considering an outside roller, as it gives you an extra length. This limits me to parking bigger cars so a GT or QP won't fit now.
 
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#35
Iain - I also have the Hofmann sectional doors, and they were £3100 for two. The biggest fact in the cost is their size, and whether you go for a standard size. Our original quote was £4,300, but this was mainly because we had specced an extra wide size, and when we went back to a standard 2.7m width, this reduced the price by almost £1k...
 
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2,428
#36
I had my old wooden doors replaced with a Horman electric roller, it was insulated plus two remote controls. This was two years ago cost was £1681.68. If you want some pics let me know and I'll do it tomorrow. There is a manual override in case of no electricity, also I always turn the power off when away. I also fitted a new door to the rear so can enter from the garden.

One error was not considering an outside roller, as it gives you an extra length. This limits me to parking bigger cars so a GT or QP won't fit now.
Pics would be great mate thanks.
I was hoping to keep the costs down a bit so it wouldn't eat in to the GTO Grill / Splitters fund.
Its becoming a necessity though as I often can't be bothered to get out to open the doors. :/
 
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#37
Iain - I also have the Hofmann sectional doors, and they were £3100 for two. The biggest fact in the cost is their size, and whether you go for a standard size. Our original quote was £4,300, but this was mainly because we had specced an extra wide size, and when we went back to a standard 2.7m width, this reduced the price by almost £1k...

Holy **** thats quite a bit. I have an 'over and under' if thats what its called - and enough space , so it might be more cost effective to fit a motorised component? I do like the Hofmann sectional doors though. Look very cool. I might get some when the house itself is finished.
 
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#39
Nice looking for sure. Looking forward to seeing your floor too mate- mine definitely needs doing.
What do most people do with the walls? Just paint or dot and dab and insulate?
 
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4,034
#40
I'm going to dot/dab/fix insulated plaster board on mine. I have done plasterboards a few times now using square edged 8 x 4 boards with a small double d round hockey stick/trim stuck over the joints. Then paint straight over. Saves plastering or taping/filling joints and gives a nice feature finish as well.