Maserati 2.24v at BonhamsMPH

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,338

Estimate of 10k ish. It's a lefty, but it's a manual.
Anyway, the pictures don't show it at its best, and I'm not a huge fan of the extra-shiny grille parts. But then you get to the 'aftermarket' instruments... anyway thought it might raise a smile.
 

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Oneball

Member
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5,511
WTF!

love the wing mirror resting on the wiper cover :D must have fallen off some point during the photo shoot.
 

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,338
Why would you buy that when you could get a largely sorted QPV DS for same money?
Not really a like for like comparison really. You're more likely to put it up against a BMW 635 CSI/325i/535i from the same era...
 

dickyb

Member
Messages
358
All 2.24Vs were LHD and manual, the 2.24V was a 2.0 domestic market model and the 2.0 Biturbo variants were never offered with an automatic gearbox.

This particular car has the potential to be a hidden gem under all the rubbish aftermarket grilles and massacred front bumper; these are fairly easily reversed if you can find the original parts. This could be a case of the vendor not really understanding what they have. This car has a full leather interior which would be ultra rare on a 2.24V as it was a very expensive option that hardly any customers selected; the outer bolsters would usually be alcantara on a 2.24V. This car also has darkened rear lights and these together with the full leather interior would hint to me that this car is in fact a Racing as both of these features were standard on this model. This would make this particular car a whole different kettle of fish because the Racing, along with it’s rest of the world equivalent, the 222 4V is seen as the holy grail of Biturbos and are quite valuable. Only 230 Racings were built and they are highly sought after by collectors. The chassis number of this car also falls within a range of known Racing chassis numbers which further fuels the evidence. It’s quite unusual for a Racing to have wood interior trim as they usually had grey inserts, but wood was an option, albeit quite rare with only 4 or 5 known cars so equipped. The fact that it’s badged as a 2.24V is odd but it may be the result of an unobservant bodyshop or lack of availability for the correct badge after the original went missing. You’d need to see the chassis plate to confirm the engine type, if it really is a Racing it should be AM490 but just looking at the right side cam cover will be a giveaway as it should say “Racing” on it. If it’s not too rusty and really is a Racing rather than a 2.24V it could be a lucky find. It’s not uncommon for unscrupulous sellers to work in the opposite way and to try to pass off a 2.24V as a Racing, it would be easy to fool someone who didn’t know what they were looking at.

A 2.24V or a Racing would be a very different experience to a QPV, a well sorted 2.24V still feels fairly quick even today. Handling is also surprisingly good if everything is in good condition and it’s quite a raw and thrilling driving experience as the cars are quite light and have no driver aids. A Racing is like a 2.24V turned up to 11 and will scare the **** out of you (in a good way), if you think of it as a Ghibli Clubsport you’ll get the idea. A QPV is a heavy luxury barge, more comfortable, quieter but nowhere near as exciting to drive.
 
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lifes2short

Member
Messages
4,261
All 2.24Vs were LHD and manual, the 2.24V was a 2.0 domestic market model and the 2.0 Biturbo variants were never offered with an automatic gearbox.

This particular car has the potential to be a hidden gem under all the rubbish aftermarket grilles and massacred front bumper; these are fairly easily reversed if you can find the original parts. This could be a case of the vendor not really understanding what they have. This car has a full leather interior which would be ultra rare on a 2.24V as it was a very expensive option that hardly any customers selected; the outer bolsters would usually be alcantara on a 2.24V. This car also has darkened rear lights and these together with the full leather interior would hint to me that this car is in fact a Racing as both of these features were standard on this model. This would make this particular car a whole different kettle of fish because the Racing, along with it’s rest of the world equivalent, the 222 4V is seen as the holy grail of Biturbos and are quite valuable. Only 230 Racings were built and they are highly sought after by collectors. The chassis number of this car also falls within a range of known Racing chassis numbers which further fuels the evidence. It’s quite unusual for a Racing to have wood interior trim as they usually had grey inserts, but wood was an option, albeit quite rare with only 4 or 5 known cars so equipped. The fact that it’s badged as a 2.24V is odd but it may be the result of an unobservant bodyshop or lack of availability for the correct badge after the original went missing. You’d need to see the chassis plate to confirm the engine type, if it really is a Racing it should be AM490 but just looking at the right side cam cover will be a giveaway as it should say “Racing” on it. If it’s not too rusty and really is a Racing rather than a 2.24V it could be a lucky find. It’s not uncommon for unscrupulous sellers to work in the opposite way and to try to pass off a 2.24V as a Racing, it would be easy to fool someone who didn’t know what they were looking at.
very interesting indeed, as you say either someones missing the real deal here or a cunning plan to fool buyers in a round about way
 

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,338
All 2.24Vs were LHD and manual, the 2.24V was a 2.0 domestic market model and the 2.0 Biturbo variants were never offered with an automatic gearbox.

This particular car has the potential to be a hidden gem under all the rubbish aftermarket grilles and massacred front bumper; these are fairly easily reversed if you can find the original parts. This could be a case of the vendor not really understanding what they have. This car has a full leather interior which would be ultra rare on a 2.24V as it was a very expensive option that hardly any customers selected; the outer bolsters would usually be alcantara on a 2.24V. This car also has darkened rear lights and these together with the full leather interior would hint to me that this car is in fact a Racing as both of these features were standard on this model. This would make this particular car a whole different kettle of fish because the Racing, along with it’s rest of the world equivalent, the 222 4V is seen as the holy grail of Biturbos and are quite valuable. Only 230 Racings were built and they are highly sought after by collectors. The chassis number of this car also falls within a range of known Racing chassis numbers which further fuels the evidence. It’s quite unusual for a Racing to have wood interior trim as they usually had grey inserts, but wood was an option, albeit quite rare with only 4 or 5 known cars so equipped. The fact that it’s badged as a 2.24V is odd but it may be the result of an unobservant bodyshop or lack of availability for the correct badge after the original went missing. You’d need to see the chassis plate to confirm the engine type, if it really is a Racing it should be AM490 but just looking at the right side cam cover will be a giveaway as it should say “Racing” on it. If it’s not too rusty and really is a Racing rather than a 2.24V it could be a lucky find. It’s not uncommon for unscrupulous sellers to work in the opposite way and to try to pass off a 2.24V as a Racing, it would be easy to fool someone who didn’t know what they were looking at.

A 2.24V or a Racing would be a very different experience to a QPV, a well sorted 2.24V still feels fairly quick even today. Handling is also surprisingly good if everything is in good condition and it’s quite a raw and thrilling driving experience as the cars are quite light and have no driver aids. A Racing is like a 2.24V turned up to 11, if you think of it as a Ghibli Clubsport you’ll get the idea
I was wondering about this – I spotted the Koni adjustable suspension tab. Was it an option on the 2.24v – part of my brain seems to remember it only being standard on the Racing in that era (I'm probably wrong)?
 

dickyb

Member
Messages
358
The 2.24V was the first Biturbo model to feature the Koni electronically adjustable suspension and it became standard on all subsequent models although it was a no-cost option to delete it and have standard non-adjustable damper.
 

zagatoes30

Centenary Club
Messages
15,707
Love this Biturbo shape, a good racing would get me back into a Maserati - so should have bought Stuarts old one a couple of years ago. There is a thread there cars you should have bought but decided against, I have a list of my own list and it pains me to read it it.
 

Nayf

Member
Messages
1,338
The 2.24V was the first Biturbo model to feature the Koni electronically adjustable suspension and it became standard on all subsequent models although it was a no-cost option to delete it and have standard non-adjustable damper.
Thanks, I was wrong. Judging by the tyres and the discs (which indicate some time spent in the great outdoors) I'm not hopeful for its rust-resistance. A hint to its history is on the right-side door...
 
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Maurizio

New Member
Messages
27
If this was a Racing (which I doubt), then the engine covers should carry the 'Racing' wording, too.
 

azapa

Member
Messages
1,107
very attractive car indeed and probably a good buy if the rust worm has not taken it's toll yet. hope it goes to a good home
 

dickyb

Member
Messages
358
If this was a Racing (which I doubt), then the engine covers should carry the 'Racing' wording, too.
We’d need to see the engine bay to be sure, as you say there should be “Racing” written on the right side cam cover

80371

and it would also be useful to see the chassis plate to see the engine type number, it should be AM490. I do think that there is clear evidence to suggest it is a Racing - full grey leather interior, smoked rear lights and most significantly the chassis number falls with a known range of other Racings, I.e there are genuine Racings with chassis numbers either side of this car. This car’s chassis number is: ZAMB00MB121401,
the Racing register shows cars ZAMB00MB121380 and ZAMB00MB121404 which are genuine Racings.
Only a closer inspection would confirm but at first glance this does seem to be a Racing, albeit not in great shape at the moment.
Asking prices in Europe can be as high as 40000 euros for a really nice one.
 
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dickyb

Member
Messages
358
Looks like they’ve posted some more photos and on closer inspection I can confirm it’s not a Racing after all, a false alarm I’m afraid ☹. it does look as though someone has tarted up a 2.24v to look like a Racing. The clues I needed to confirm one way or another are now available to see. The engine code is AM475 which makes it a 2.24v, as does the lack of the Racing logo on the cam cover. It’s rare for a 2.24v to have full leather but it’s easy enough to swap it out from a Ghibli or a Racing/222 4V and simple enough to black out the rear lights. Sorry, thought I’d spotted a hidden gem there

 
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lifes2short

Member
Messages
4,261
still a nice looking motor though, engine bay looks clean/tidy, interesting that there's no mot history after 2012 and no description/write up yet